Harpsichord and Lute Music

Errata and addenda

1 November 2017

This book was published in 1987.  The following are for those using the book as it is.  A complete updating to current circumstances would be a research project in its own right.

It is not possible to use in-text music symbols in this programme, so read # for sharp, b for flat, h for natural.

p.
vii   26.   < Froberger >

viii   52.   < 117 >

—    58.   < in a sarabande >

xiv   para.3 line 4   < plucked stringed >

1      Douglas Maple (review in The Musical Times cxxx (1/1989) p.26) pointed out that in this chapter I should have made it clearer that the word ‘espinette’ was used generically for all plucked-string keyboards including ‘clavecin’ (evidence for this is given by Frank Hubbard, Three Centuries of Harpsichord Making (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1974) p.88). There are nonetheless many documents (inventories of maker’s workshops, keyboard players’ instruments, accounts of musical events) which include both terms so presumably intend a differentiation. Particularly striking is Mersenne’s switch from ‘espinette’ to ‘clavecin’ in his history of the Champion family when he comes to Chambonnières (see p.24). This may have had something to do with the importation of Flemish harpsichords (Chambonnières evidently owned a harpsichord by Jan Couchet).

4      para.1, 4th last line   < in the possession of the organist Pierre >

6      para.1 last sentence   Not true: the charge of ‘premier organiste de la Chapelle’ held by Chambonnières’s grandfather Thomas Champion dit Mithou was inherited by Chambonnières’s father Jacques Champion de la Chapelle and subsequently by Chambonnières himself (see Dufourcq 1972 p.58, and David Fuller and David Ledbetter, ‘(4) Jacques Champion (ii), Sieur de La Chapelle’, New Grove 2.

7      para.2 last sentence:   David Harris, in his new edition of D’Anglebert’s works (New York: The Broude Trust, 2009) Part 2 p.73, points out that D’Anglebert at his death possessed an old lute in the attic, perhaps a relic of his early engagement with lute repertory.

9      para.1 line 4   < king (then Daufin): >

12    para.1 line 8   < serious >

15    para 1 second last line   <published by Jurgens >

16    para.2 line 5   < 1620s and 1630s >

17    para.1 line 5   < fut dansé >

21    last para.   Mersenne repeats the often-cited views of Plato and other ancient Greek philosophers on the moral values of Dorian music, see Andrew Barker, Greek Musical Writings. Volume I: The Musician and his Art (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1984), pp. 131, 137-8, 168). The funnel simile was a familiar pointer to Plato, as for example in M.H. Fuhrmann’s Musicalischer-Trichter ([Berlin], 1706).

22   para.3 line 2   < Le Gallois >

24   para.10 line 7   < Chanbonniere >

25   para.7 line 1   < There is a style which should be placed above all others, >

26   para.1 line 13   < suggested >

—   line 14   < preferred >

—   para.4 line 3   < beautifully >

27   para.6 last line   < einem >

28   para.4 line 1   < tremblemens…martelemens >

33   para.2 lines 2–3   < notes of contrapuntal >

34   para.1 line 3   < about them at >

—   para.3 line 6   < beat, are replaced >

35   Ex.2 system 2 last two bars: for comments on the transcription see Andreas Schlegel, ‘Bemerkungen zur “Rhétorique des dieux”. Zweiter Teil: die Tabulatureinträge vor dem stilistischen Hintergrund der französischen Lautenmusik des 17. Jahrhunderts’, Gitarre und Laute (3/1989) p.23 n.4.

37   Ex.3 tablature last two bars: d over b in each case

40   Preludes: François-Pierre Goy gives the earliest known semi-measured prelude as around 1620, in Mesangeau’s handwriting, and cites several others very similar in length and composition (unattributed) in three sources datable from the mid-1620s (‘Some additional information on Wolfgang von Grünbühel’s Lute Book’, The Lute, 48 (2008) pp.76-7).

44   para.5 second last line: delete comma

48   para.4 line 6   < that many of its >

54   Ex.9: add < T10 > above beginning of tablature

55   Ex.9 bar 4 tablature: move the semiquaver flag to the left above the fourth-course a, and the second quaver left above the third-course a

59   Ex.11 tablature bar 2: transfer dot from first to second crotchet

62   para.4 line 7   < striking are >

65   para.2 last line   < transcribed, are >

67   Ex.14 bar 12 second tablature system: change first rhythm sign from crotchet to quaver

71   Ex.16 bar 23 Stockholm 2: bass F in the source, should probably be f

78  Ex.22 tablature bar 6 second beat: delete thumb stroke

—  bar 7 first beat: add a and f to RH crotchet chord

80   Ex.23b: add bar number 22 over first tablature bar

86   para.3 line 7   < assimilated >

89   Ex.25 bar 8: add slur over first to last RH notes of bar

—   bar 8: add third-space < b >  to RH last beat

—   bar 9: RH notes should be < a b c d b >  (all third space) with slur over first to last notes of the bar

112   para.3 line 7   < arpégé >

113   para.4 line 2   < allemande JACQUET, p. 18 (from >

116   para.2 line 7   < bars 13–14 >

119   para.2, 4th last line   < luxuriant >

123   Ex.58 caption   < in a sarabande >   not courante

132   Ex.65: upper keyboard system should be labelled < (a) >

136   Ex.68: first upper keyboard system should be labelled < (a) >

137   Ex.69 bar 1: AA minim should be dotted

137   Ex.70 caption: omit ‘and type 1 sarabande movement’

142   n.7 line 3   < 17th-century >

151    n.175   < Music, I p. 104 >

—     n.184   < 15601 >

152   n.191 line 1   < Proposition >

—    n.202   < viole, p. 23 >

155  n.131  Göttweig I also has a lute version of Chambonnières’s sarabande Jeunes zéphirs on ff.14′-15; this and the Iris arrangement are currently the only known lute versions of pieces by Chambonnières.

156   n.37: Gustafson has revised his dating to ‘probably c1690, but after 1676’. Damien Vaisse has found use of the paper as early as 1667, and use of the arms in 1664, see C. David Harris (ed.), Jean Henry D’Anglebert. The Collected Works (New York: The Broude Trust, 2009) Part 2 p.159. For further discussion of the origin of the Bauyn MS see Siegbert Rampe in Froberger. New Edition of the Complete Works I: Keyboard and Organ Works from Autograph Sources, Libro Secondo (1649), (Kassel: Bärenreiter, 2013), pp. XXXI-XXXIII. Gustafson, in his edition The Bauyn Manuscript (New York: The Broude Trust, 2014), Part IV, concludes that it is most likely to be a retrospective anthology compiled in the 1690s as a memento of the brilliant early reign of Louis XIV. A number of lute manuscripts have a similar character, notably the Saizenay MSS. More recently (published in 2017 in spite of the issue date) Glen Wilson has suggested that Bauyn was copied by a member of the Burette family from a Couperin family MS collection, and proposes Charles Couperin (1638–1679), second of the three brothers brought by Chambonnières to Paris and father of François Couperin le grand, as the composer of most of the pieces attributed to ‘Couperin’ (however spelt, and never with a first name) in the Bauyn and Parville MSS; ‘The other Mr Couperin’, Early Keyboard Journal xxx (2013), pp.6-25. A similar proposal about a Couperin family MS collection was made by Davitt Moroney in his introduction to the facsimile (Geneva: Minkoff, 2/1998).

158   n.21   < time are to >

159   n.23   < prélude >

162   line 4   < Catherine >

163   Jurgens   < Minutier >

164   Denis: add   < English translation by Vincent J. Panetta, Treatise on Harpsichord Tuning by Jean Denis (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1987) >

165   Perrine line 1   < le luth >

166   Brunold line 2   < 1965 >

168   Harris-Warrick line 1   < intro. and >

169   < Le Moël >   line 13   < et de plusieurs >

170   < McGowan >

—    after Maier add   < Maple, Douglas, ‘D’Anglebert’s Autograph Manuscript, Paris, B.N. Rés.89ter: An Examination of Compositional, Educational, Editorial, and Notational Processes in 17th-Century French Harpsichord Music’, Ph.D. diss., University of Chaicago, 1988.

—    after Massip add   < Mather, Betty Bang and Dean M. Karns, Dance Rhythms of the French Baroque (Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 1987). >

—    Prévost line 1   < prélude >

172   Tagliavini line 3   < 299–308 >

174   after Aberdeen add   < ADLER II   Johann Jakob Froberger: Suiten für Klavier II, ed. G. Adler, Denkmäler der Tonkunst in Österreich, xiii (Graz: Akademische Druck- und Verlagsanstalt, 1959). >

—    Bataille 2 line 1   < mis >

175   Brossard   Vm7 370 >

176  Gallot line 2   < [c1681–83] >   see C. Massip in Oeuvres des Gallot, ed. M. Rollin (Paris: CNRS, 1987) p. xix

—    after Gaultier Pieces add   < Gen. 2348/53   F-Psg ms.2348/53 (post c1658?) >

178  after R. Ballard 1614 add < R. Dowland 1610   Robert Dowland, Varietie of Lute Lessons (London: Thomas Adams, 1610). >

—    Rostock 54   < ms.XVII >

179  Saizenay 1, 2   both < (c1699) > according to M.Rollin in Oeuvres des Gallot (see p.176 above) p. xxx.  (1 Ex Libris dated Paris 1699; 2 begun 4 August 1699)

180  before the last entry add   Anon.: Pavane (no. 36), K. Borel; L. CNRS.  This Pavane is based on a lute Fantasia by Robert Johnson, for details see John Reeve, ‘English lute music in transitional tunings, a new discovery’, The Lute xlix (2009) pp.36-48.

182  < Ennemond Gaultier: Courante ‘La petite bergère’ >

183  For the Mesangeau Sarabande add the lute source F-Pn [Mss] Fr. 16987 p. 61

184  Ennemond Gaultier: Chaconne:  other concordances in Burwell f. 32′ ‘Ciacona’ (refrain only); Monin ff. 38′-39, untitled shorter version; Ruthven, untitled, incomplete; F-Pn Rés. 823 ff. 67′-68.  See Anthony Bailes, ‘”The bowe that is too much bent, breaketh”; the pitch of Miss Burwell’s lute, reconsidered’, The Lute liv (2014), pp. 1-35, esp. pp. 6, 18, endnote 21.

185  < 5   e’ b g e c G >

—   < 10   eb’ c’ ab f c G >

186  Anthony   < xiii >

—   < ballet, xiv, >

—   < barré, xi, >

—   Brenet   < xiv >

—   < brisure, xi, >

187  < campanella, xi, >

—   Cellier   < xv >

—   Chambonnières   < xv >

—   < Couperin, Louis, x, >

190  Geoffroy   < xv >

—   Gustafson   < xv >

—   < Jacquet I, xvi, >

—   Jacquet de la Guerre   < Claude, xvi, >

—   Jacquot   < xiii >

191  Lacroix   < xiv >

—   Lavignac   < ix >

—   Le Gallois   < xiv >

—   Lully   < xv >

192  Mersenne   < xiv >

—   < pitch, xii, >

193  < Quittard, Henri, ix, xiii, >

—   < sans chanterelle, xii, >

—   < sliding stroke, xii, >

—   < spinet, xiii, xv, >

194  < style brisé, xiv, >

—   < tenues, xii, >

—   < texture, keyboard, xv, >

—   < timbre, xii, >

—   < tirer et rabattre, xii, >

—   < trait, xii, >

—   < Trichet, Pierre, xiv, >

—   < tunings, lute, xii, >

—   < vieil ton, xii, >